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Three-dimensional quantification of regional left-ventricular dyssynchrony by magnetic resonance imaging

By: Bracke, F.; Prinzen, F.W.; Aben, J.; Houthuizen, P.; van den Bosch, H.; Mischi, M.; Kaklidou, F.; Korsten, H.H.M.;

2011 / IEEE / 978-1-4577-1589-1

Description

This item was taken from the IEEE Conference ' Three-dimensional quantification of regional left-ventricular dyssynchrony by magnetic resonance imaging ' Heart failure accounts for over five million patients in the United States alone. Many of them present dyssynchronous left ventricular (LV) contraction, whose treatment by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is until now guided by electrocardiographic analysis. One third of the selected patients, however, does not respond to the therapy. Aiming at improving the response rate, recent studies showed the importance of left bundle branch block (LBBB) configurations. Therefore, in order to detect motion patterns that relate to LBBB, this paper presents a novel method for three-dimensional quantification of regional LV mechanical dyssynchrony. LV wall-motion analysis is performed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cines segmented by commercial software. Mutual delays between endocardial wall motion in different LV regions are estimated by cross correlation followed by phase difference analysis in frequency domain, achieving unlimited time resolution. Rather than focusing on the systolic phase, the full cardiac cycle is used to estimate the contraction timing. The method was successfully validated against MRI tagging in five dogs before and after LBBB induction. Preliminary validation in humans with 10 LBBB patients and 7 healthy subjects showed the method feasibility and reproducibility, with sensitivity and specificity in LBBB detection equal to 95.1% and 99.4%, respectively.