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Time Allocation Decisions of Academic Scientists and Their Impact on Technology Commercialization

By: Libaers, D.P.;

2012 / IEEE

Description

This item was taken from the IEEE Periodical ' Time Allocation Decisions of Academic Scientists and Their Impact on Technology Commercialization ' This study analyzes how the time allocation decisions of tenured and tenure-track academic scientists in U.S. research universities affect the odds of being engaged in the creation, transfer, and commercialization of novel technologies with one or more industrial partners. Academic scientists are making time allocation decisions across three types of activities typically associated with the academic profession: teaching, research, and service. In a representative sample of 1543 scientists, the empirical results show that those scientists spending more time on research funded by federal grants and industrial contracts have higher propensity of being engaged in technology commercialization efforts than those who spent less time on this type of research. In contrast, scientists spending more time on research that is not funded by grants or industry contracts have significantly lower chances of being involved in technology commercialization. Surprisingly, spending more time on either teaching undergraduate or graduate students does not affect scientists' chances for technology commercialization. Scientists doing more paid consulting also have a higher likelihood of being involved in technology commercialization. Finally, we found complementary and substituting effects between certain types of research and time spent on teaching undergraduate students and their impact on being involved in technology commercialization. We discuss the implications for policy and academic entrepreneurship.